Happy Birthday, Mr. Rogers
Happy Birthday, Mr. Rogers

Even though the final episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood aired 17 years ago, Fred Rogers’s seminal children’s program is as present as ever. This year is the 50th anniversary of the show’s premiere, and on Tuesday Rogers—who died of stomach cancer in 2003 at the age of 74—would have turned 90.

To mark Mr. Rogers’s birthday, Focus Features debuted the first trailer for the new documentary Won’t You Be My Neighbor?. Directed by Morgan Neville (who won an Oscar for 20 Feet from Stardom), the film is “an intimate look at America’s favorite neighbor.” The documentary premiered at Sundance earlier this year and will be in theaters June 8.

“To me when I really tried to distill what Fred was talking about to one thing, I came up with the phrase radical kindness,” Neville told Deadline in January. “Why I think Fred was so profound in his day was that he was the perfect person that came along at the right time, at the right place, with a new medium. For the first time there was a generation of kids being raised by a television, and Fred was somebody who was there basically as a substitute parent in many, many households.”

The first-look at Won’t You Be My Neighbor? isn’t the only celebration marking Mr. Rogers’s birthday. Beginning at 10 a.m. PT, Twitch is airing 90 of the most popular episodes of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. And that’s just for starters. The gaming platform is also planning to run every episode of the show—all 886 episodes.

The Twitch marathon comes on the heels of another documentary celebrating everyone’s favorite neighbor. Earlier this month, PBS, which carried Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood during its original run and currently carries the animated offshoot Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood, premiered its own tribute to Fred Rogers. Mister Rogers: It’s You I Like, hosted by actor Michael Keaton (who got his start on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood as a stagehand), featured an all-star lineup of actors and entertainers paying tribute to Rogers, like Sarah Silverman, John Lithgow, Judd Apatow, Whoopi Goldberg and Yo-Yo Ma.

And if that weren’t enough, Mr. Rogers is also being celebrated by the U.S. Postal Service, which is releasing a commemorative Forever stamp on March 23. The stamp—featuring an image of Fred Rogers in his trademark red cardigan alongside King Friday XIII, one of the residents of the Neighborhood of Make-Believe—celebrates the “groundbreaking public television series” that “inspired and educated young viewers with warmth, sensitivity, and honesty,” the Post Office said in a press release.

“Mister Rogers always managed to find wonder in seemingly everyday things, turning visits to factories, farms and museums into engaging and educational journeys,” the USPS continued. “To generations of viewers who grew up enjoying his show, Rogers remains a beloved figure.”